Tech Tips: Fuel
Stations that sell ethanol free gas:  Costco 91, Canadian Tire 91, Esso 91, Ultramar 91, Shell V- Power Facts about unleaded gasoline The reason we do not stock these inserts is that many cylinder heads have already been fitted with valve seat inserts (which may or may not be the chrome/nickle type) and fitting dimensions vary greatly as do a number of other factors. Valve seat inserts can fall out if not installed properly so it is best for your machinist to install his/her favorite brand of inserts for best results. A possible alternative to having valve seat inserts fitted is to have a heat-treating specialist induction-harden your original cast iron seats. This was the solution undertaken by some of the motor manufacturers, but finding a specialist to handle this type of work may be difficult, if not impossible. The new seats will solve 50% of the problem but exhaust valves and guides should also be replaced for a 100% conversion to lead-free fuel. We stock a full range of Stellite-faced stainless steel valves which are far more burn resistant than original equipment valves. When used in conjunction with nickel/chrome valve seats, recession is all but eliminated. Stellite intake valves and chrome/nickle valve seats are not required as the incoming fuel insures safe operating temperatures for these components. The final aspect concerns both intake and exhaust valve guides. Exhaust guides in particular, originally received most of their lubrication from the tetraethyl lead. Without the lead, stock cast iron guides wear rapidly and eventually cause valve seat & face problems simply because of the excess wear in the stem area. Keep in mind that intake guides have a tendency to suck oil down the guide which sometimes results in excessive oil consumption particularly if the valve stem seals are installed incorrectly or have disintegrated. Exhaust valves, on the other hand, are never well lubricated as hot exhaust gases tend to blow up the valve stem. We stock a full range of silicon bronze guides which have better "self lubricating" properties than cast iron. Most are listed in our recent update but an expanded range is now available (see below). Silicon guides should be run a bit on the loose side as this material has a greater expansion rate than cast iron. These guides can seize if not reamed to provide adequate clearance, particularly on the exhaust side. Many enthusiasts have experimented with fitting Teflon "umbrella type" valve stem oil seals as a way of completely eliminating intake valve guide oil consumption. This was an effective modification when full strength leaded fuel was available. However, with the currently available fuels, only stock type valve stem seals should be fitted. With the above 3-step conversion completed, your vintage sports car is now fully up to modern standards and can safely be run on ordinary unleaded fuel without the addition of Relead or other lead substitutes. Why not plan to upgrade your trusty sports car before the spring and summer driving season really gets underway? A leisurely weekend to remove, followed a week or two later by a re-installation session and you can forget about what damage is being done by running an unconverted engine on unleaded fuel. The reason why we don't stock these but they are readily available from virtually all reputable automotive machine shops, as inserts are stocked by size not by specific application. The inserts you need for your Healey 100-4 may be the same as for a Diesel Buick! The reason we do not stock these inserts is that many cylinder heads have already been fitted with valve seat inserts (which may or may not be the chrome/nickle type) and fitting dimensions vary greatly as do a number of other factors. Valve seat inserts can fall out if not installed properly so it is best for your machinist to install his/her favorite brand of inserts for best results. A possible alternative to having valve seat inserts fitted is to have a heat-treating specialist induction-harden your original cast iron seats. This was the solution undertaken by some of the motor manufacturers, but finding a specialist to handle this type of work may be difficult, if not impossible. The new seats will solve 50% of the problem but exhaust valves and guides should also be replaced for a 100% conversion to lead-free fuel. We stock a full range of Stellite-faced stainless steel valves which are far more burn resistant than original equipment valves. When used in conjunction with nickel/chrome valve seats, recession is all but eliminated. Stellite intake valves and chrome/nickle valve seats are not required as the incoming fuel insures safe operating temperatures for these components. The final aspect concerns both intake and exhaust valve guides. Exhaust guides in particular, originally received most of their lubrication from the tetraethyl lead. Without the lead, stock cast iron guides wear rapidly and eventually cause valve seat & face problems simply because of the excess wear in the stem area. Keep in mind that intake guides have a tendency to suck oil down the guide which sometimes results in excessive oil consumption particularly if the valve stem seals are installed incorrectly or have disintegrated. Exhaust valves, on the other hand, are never well lubricated as hot exhaust gases tend to blow up the valve stem. We stock a full range of silicon bronze guides which have better "self lubricating" properties than cast iron. Most are listed in our recent update but an expanded range is now available (see below). Silicon guides should be run a bit on the loose side as this material has a greater expansion rate than cast iron. These guides can seize if not reamed to provide adequate clearance, particularly on the exhaust side. Many enthusiasts have experimented with fitting Teflon "umbrella type" valve stem oil seals as a way of completely eliminating intake valve guide oil consumption. This was an effective modification when full strength leaded fuel was available. However, with the currently available fuels, only stock type valve stem seals should be fitted. With the above 3-step conversion completed, your vintage sports car is now fully up to modern standards and can safely be run on ordinary unleaded fuel without the addition of Relead or other lead substitutes. Why not plan to upgrade your trusty sports car before the spring and summer driving season really gets underway? A leisurely weekend to remove, followed a week or two later by a re-installation session and you can forget about what damage is being done by running an unconverted engine on unleaded fuel.
Niagara British Car Club